Rom. 8:15 For you did not receive the spirit of slavery leading again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption, by whom we cry, “Abba, Father.”
The day has finally come.  You have been anxiously awaiting this moment.  Finally, no more moving from house to house.  No more foster parents.  Finally, a permanent home!  But what will life be like?  How do you suddenly call people who were not previously part of your life family?  How will life change?  So many questions are running through your mind as your adoptive parents come to receive you.  You are happy, but also apprehensive.  At the house, the children there are excited about having another sibling, but now they too have questions.  Does this new child have the same rights and privileges as we do?  Will the new child receive the same attention?  While this example is an earthly example, it can also apply in the kingdom.  How do I fit into the family of God?  What if those in the family of God treat me as different because I come into the family with a different background, and different experiences?
The psalmist wrote “He gives families to the lonely, and releases prisoners from jail, singing with joy! But for rebels there is famine and distress.” (Psa. 68:6 TLB) God takes those who are lonely and sets them in a family; but does that mean that the tendency to be lonely immediately disappears?  Not at all!  There is a proverb that warns us what happens when we demand our own way instead of the new way of life in a family:
Prov. 18:1 He who separates himself indulges his desires and shows contempt for sound advice of any kind. (CJB)
In other words, just because we are adopted into a family, doesn’t mean we receive the adoption in our minds and in our hearts.  In fact, in the passage in Romans, the word “received” could easily be translated “to lay hold of” or “to seize.”  These are much more aggressive terms than to receive.  Here is how the Lord Jesus described it:
Matt. 11:12 And from the days of John the Baptist until now, the kingdom of the heavens is taken by violence and the violent seize it. (BLB)
This spirit of adoption must be seized by each child.  This adoption is a bilateral agreement, where both parties must act.  The adoptive family must bring me in, but I must also seize this spirit of adoption.  I must lay hold of this adoptive influence.  How, then, will others know that I am now part of this family?  Through my actions.  I am transitioning from being an independent person to being a dependent child.  This is a challenge for us today, especially when we have been raised to be independent people in the flesh.  Simply put, we cannot do it alone.  We need each other to remind us that God has not abandoned us, and has provided us with an eternal family.  We must provoke one another to shed the baggage of the past independent life and enjoy life in this new family.  We are to remind one another of the rules of the house, which we are expected to obey.  That obedience is proof of our adoption.  Your adoptive family has received you; the question is have you received your adoptive family?